Wanted Dead Or Alive by Nancy Marie: Research Notes

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Chapter 2

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Modoc horses
The stallion Johnny rides is a real breed. I chose this breed because of its heart and soul to survive just like Johnny’. Even though the Modoc was not located in said area where Johnny finds his stallion, I still chose to use this breed because in the pilot episode of “ The Big Valley ” Heath’ horse Charger is a Modoc.
Modoc mustangs are direct descendants of a light draft and quarter horses. They have a physical consistency between members – sturdy build and bay coloration.
You can find Modoc mustangs still today at Devil’s Garden Plateau Wild Horse Territory in Modoc National Forest in Northern California.
The best explanation of the derivation of the word “ Modoc ” itself is that it is a corruption of two words from the Klamath Indian tongue, “ Moa ” meaning “ Southern ”and “ Dock ” representing near, the term being applied by the Klamath Indians to their hereditary foes living to the south. Some authorities however credit General John Charles Fremont as coining the name in 1846 from a novel he read were the main character of which was named “ Maidac ” The first definition of the one most accepted.
The Modoc mustang is also known as “ The Warhorse ” because of its strong muscular build and heartiness. The Modoc Indians used these strong horses when they moved from camp to camp depending on the season.)

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Chapter 4 and Chapter 8

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Central Pacific Railroad
The railroad mentioned in this chapter and future chapters was real. As were Theodore Judah and Charles Crocker.
The Central Pacific Railroad ( CPRR ) was a route between California and Utah built eastward from the west coast in the 1860s to complete the western part of the “ First Transcontinental Railroad ” in North America. It later became part of the Union Pacific Railroad ( UPRR )
Planned by Theodore Judah, the Central Pacific Railroad was authorized by congress in 1862. It was financed and built through “ The Big Four ” ( who called themselves  “ The Associates ” ) Sacramento, California businessmen Leland Stanford, Collis Huntington, Charles Crocker and Mark Hopkins. Crocker was in charge of construction. Construction crews comprised of 12,000 Chinese emigrant workers by 1868, when they constituted 80% of the entire work force. They laid the first rail in 1863. The “ Golden Spike ”, connecting the western railroad to the Union Pacific ( UPRR ) at Promontory, Utah was hammered on May 10th, 1869. )

In this story I have mentioned a couple times the Central Pacific Railroad and two men named Theodore Judah and Charles Crocker. Both these men are real and were part of the CPRR. Theodore Judah is the man who planned the CPRR which was authorized by congress in 1862. It was financed through “ The Big Four ” ( who called themselves “ The Associates ” ) Sacramento, California businessmen Leland Stanford, Collis Huntington, Charles Crocker and Mark Hopkins. Crocker like mentioned in my story, was in charge of construction. Construction crews comprised of 12,000 Chinese emigrant workers by 1868, when they constituted 80% of the entire workforce. They laid the first rails in 1863. The “ Golden Spike ”, connecting the western railroad to the Union Pacific Railroad UPRR at Promontory, Utah was hammered on Ma 10th, 1869.

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Chapter 10

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Gold Prospecting
Below is a portion of what I found in my research about prospecting/ mining for gold in the state of California. A law was passed allowing the purchase of land at $2.50 to $5.00 an acre providing those acres purchased were used solely for mining of minerals listed below. 6 states had to honor this law and 4 of them still have this  law on the books to date. Nevada, Oregon, Arizona and California. Said land purchased at these prices could be sold, but only for the amount originally sold for of $2.50 or $5.00 an acre.

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The Mining Law of 1872
The Chaffee Law of 1869 and the Placer Law of 1871 were combined into the General Mining Act of 1872. The mining law of 1866 had given discoverers rights to stake mining claims to extract Gold, Silver, Cinnabar ( the principal Ore of Mercury ) and Copper. When Congress passed the General Mining Act of 1872, the wording was changed to “ Or other valuable deposits,”  giving greater scope to the law. The 1872 act also granted extra-lateral rights to lode claims. And fixed the maximum size of lode claims as 1500′ ( 457m ) long and 600′ ( 183m ) wide.
The General Mining Act of 1872 is a United States Federal Law that authorizes and governs prospecting and mining for economic minerals, such as Gold, Silver, and Platinum, on federal public lands.
California Land Act of 1851, an act to ascertain and settle land claims in the state of California.

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Chapter 11

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As most of you know who have seen the pilot episode, Scott tells Johnny that he was in Phil Sheridan’s unit during the civil war. Below is some info on the real Phil Sheridan and his part in the Civil war.

Union Army of the Shenandoah
The army of the Shenandoah was a Union Army during the American Civil War, first organized as the Department of the Shenandoah in 1861 and then disbanded in early 1862, it became most effective after it’s recreation on August 1st, 1864, under Phil Sheridan. It’s valley campaigns of 1864 rendered the Shenandoah valley of Virginia unable to produce foodstuffs for the confederate states army, a condition which would speed the end of the Civil war.
Active July 25th, 1861 to March 18th, 1862 and August 1st,1864 to June 27th, 1865
Engagements: Battle of Summit Point, Battle of Opequon, Battle of Fisher’s Hill, Battle of Tom’s Brook, Battle of Cedar Creek, Battle of Waynesboro, Virginia.

Notable Commanders
MG: Robert Patterson
MG: Nathaniel P. Banks
MG: David Hunter
MG: Phil Sheridan
MG: Horatio G. Wright
BG: Alfred Thomas Torbert

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The Commander I had Marshal Jake Teague serve under was a real man. His brief history is below:

Army of the Potomac
The Army of the Potomac was the principle Union Army in the Eastern Theater of the American Civil war.  It was created in July 1861 shortly after the first Battle of Bull Run and was disbanded in May 1865 following the surrender of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in April.

Commanders of the Army of the Potomac at Culpeper, Virginia 1863 were
Gouverneur K. Warren
William H. French
George G. Meade
 Henry J. Hunt
Andrew A. Humphreys
George Sykes

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